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Srinagar is located in the heart of the Kashmir valley at an altitude of 1,730 m above sea level, spread on both sides of the river Jhelum. The Dal and Nagin lakes enhance its picturesque setting, while the changing play of the seasons and the salubrious climate ensures that the city is equally attractive to visitors around the year.

Tourist Attraction

Dal Lake
Dal Lake is one of the world's largest natural lakes. In 1200 AD, the lake covered an area of 75 sq km. By the 1980s, only 25 sq. km survived, and today this lake stretches over barely 12 sq. km. The lake now shelters about 50 hamlets with a population of over 50,000 people, who have property rights over 300 hectares (6,000 kanals) of agricultural land and 670 hectares (13,400 kanals) of water area. Besides this, a large number of commercial and residential buildings such as hotels, guesthouses, restaurants and houseboats have sprung up in and around the Dal. All this has drastically reduced the size of the lake.

Shankaracharya Temple

The Shankaracharya temple is the unique landmark of Srinagar. This temple is located on a sharp hill called Takht-e-Suleiman, about 1000 feet high, a 5 km climb from Nehru Park on a metalled road, overlooking the city. There are stone steps which will take you right on top where a small temple dedicated to Lord Shiva stands. This temple was built in the memory of the Shankaracharya who came to Kashmir from Kerala some 1200 years ago to revive Hinduism. From the top of the Shankaracharya Hill, you can have a panoramic view of the valley, city, lakes and their houseboats, waterways, gardens, the confluence of the Jhelum and Dal Lake and the seven original bridges spanning the serpentine flow of Jhelum river.

Mughal Gardens
THE MUGHAL GARDENS With terraced lawns, cascading fountains, paint-box-bright flowerbeds with the panorama of the Dal in front of them - the three Mughal Gardens of Chesmashahi, Nishat and Shalimar are the Mughal Emperors' concept of paradise and are today very popular places for picnics and excursions.

Shalimar Bagh

Shalimar Bagh was built by Emperor Jehangir for his wife Nur Jehan, 15 kms from the TRC, it is a beautiful garden with sweeping vistas over gardens and lakes, and shallow terraces. The garden is 539 m by 182 m and has four terraces, rising one above the other. A canal lined with polished stones and supplied with water from Harwan runs through the middle of the garden. The fourth terrace, by far the best, was once reserved for royal ladies.

Nishat Bagh

Nishat Bagh is situated on the banks of the Dal Lake, with the Zabarwan Mountains as its backdrop, (11 km. from TRC), this 'garden of bliss' commands a magnificent view of the lake and the snow capped Pir Panjal mountain range which stands far away to the west of the valley. Nishat was designed in 1633 AD by Asaf Khan, brother of Nur Jehan.

Chashma Shahi

Chashma Shahi is a tastefully laid garden in terraces, which commands a magnificent view of the Dal Lake below and surrounding mountain ranges. The cool water of the spring is highly refreshing and digestive. The original garden was laid out by Shah Jehan in 1632 AD. TRC Srinagar free of cost to visit the permits can be had from the infromation Counter Chashma Shahi Garden. Permits can be had from the infromation counter. Chashma Shahi

Pari Mahal

Pari Mahal Once the royal observatory, Pari Mahal has a charmingly laid out garden and is a five-minute drive from Cheshmashahi. A Buddhist monastery at one time, it was converted into a school of astrology by Dara Shikoh, Mughal Emperor Shah Jehan's eldest son. Situated on the spur of a mountain overlooking the Dal, the ancient monument, with a well-laid spacious garden in front, is connected to Cheshmashahi by road. It is illuminated at night. Harwan On the hillside, south of the village of Harwan (19 kms from the TRC)), remarkable remains of ancient ornamented tile pavements of the Buddhist period have come to light. The tiles depict the dresses of the people, such as loose trousers, Turkoman caps or close fitting turbans and large ear-rings which reveal Central Asian influence


Tulip Garden

20 lakh Tulips adorn and add color to 20 acres of the Kashmiri Landscape at 5600 feet altitude in Asia’s largest Tulip Garden - the Indira Gandhi Memorial Tulip Garden.
Tulip being one of the most expensive flowers in the world was once treated as currency because of which it earned the title and symbol of abundance and indulgence among the affluent. This explains the pride and joy that Kashmiris feel as…. for them it is more than mere long-stemmed bulbous plants – it is a whole new Tulip Culture & Revolution that has added yet another feather to the already-crowded cap of Kashmir! From its humble origin in Persia, the Tulip has travelled a long way to add colour and charm to the Kashmir Valley.

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